Meet the Cast: Steven Goldstein

BIG FISH
MAR 13 – APR 11

Tickets from $25
Wed & Thurs: 7:30PM
Fri: 8PM
Sat: 4PM & 8PM
Sun: 3PM
Approximately 2 hour and 30 minutes with one intermission.
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We’re pleased to introduce you to the actors in our New England Premiere production of BIG FISH.  The play tells the story of Edward Bloom, a traveling salesman known for his tall tales and charismatic personality. When his adult son Will discovers he is about to become a father, he sets out to discover the truth behind his father’s larger-than-life adventures.

The role of Edward Bloom will be brought to life by actor Steven Goldstein. Read our interview to find out more.


 

 

Where are you from?

Born in NYC.  I grew up near the Jersey Shore.

Have you worked with SpeakEasy prior?

First time.  Actually, this is my Boston theater debut.

Could you tell us a bit about the role you are playing?

The role of Edward is fascinating.  I get to play him at 3 different stages of his life.  He’s a man that wants to live a big life, even as a traveling salesman, and really believes he is doing so.  He is a man who understands that myth and stories aren’t about literal truth but about deeper truths and who wants desperately for his son to understand that.

What are you looking forward to in this process?

Basically everything.  It’s been so long since I’ve done a musical and I feel really honored that Paul and SpeakEasy decided to give me this chance.

Can you share a favorite memory of a parent?

My dad died when I was thirteen, (He was only 41!  Unbelievably young), but I remember him to be bigger than life.  He was gregarious, had lots of close friends that he kept from his childhood in Brooklyn, NY.  He was also a story-teller, not quite the tall tales of Edward Bloom, but about life growing up in Brooklyn, sleeping on the roof in the summer, going to Coney Island, hanging out with his Aunt Lottie (who ran a numbers racket from her apartment) and, most importantly, rooting for the (Brooklyn) Dodgers–before they broke his heart upon moving to LA.  He was a crazy baseball fan, keeping journals that I still have with his commentary from every game.  He was also at the Don Larson no-hitter, during the Yankee/Dodgers World Series.  I still have the ticket stubs and scorecard.  My dad taught me about passion, about throwing yourself into something, and about standing up for what’s right.